5 Startup Questions Before You Quit

5 Startup Questions Before You Quit

2015 is here! And I all can think about are the opportunities that await ahead for me and Leap. Five years ago I made one of the biggest decisions in my life, and decided to leave the safety of my job to pursue the path of entrepreneurship. Reflecting back on that moment I can’t help but think about the obstacles I faced, and the smart decisions I made early that lead me to success. After revisiting my own startup story, I decided to share the five most important questions I asked myself before setting out to start Leap72.

A Request That Can Kill Any Company Instantly

A Request That Can Kill Any Company Instantly

For service providers competing to differentiate their firms, the RFP process has been like a tighly fitted noose, choking away opportunities to demonstrate their value and expertise. For organizations in the public and private sectors, the request for proposal process is one that quietly has become a standard of attracting and retaining mediocrity. The time has come to put an end to RFP’s and their valueless impact.

 They are fruitless, for the organizations that issues them and for the companies who respond to them.  During their time of conception they were pretty innovative, one long document that summarises what kind of vendor you’re looking and how you would like them to respond. It was an excellent way of selecting value 30 years ago. However in this new millennium where are lives are ruled by smartphones, smartwatchs and smart TV’s, RFPs are no longer a smart way to discover value or sell value. Organizations that use the RFP process are losing the greatest asset their company has, time. 

The Book That Inspire Bill Gates's Business Vision

The Book That Inspire Bill Gates's Business Vision

Not long after I first met Warren Buffett back in 1991, I asked him to recommend his favorite book about business. He didn't miss a beat: "It's 'Business Adventures,' by John Brooks, " he said. "I'll send you my copy." I was intrigued: I had never heard of "Business Adventures" or John Brooks.

Today, more than two decades after Warren lent it to me—and more than four decades after it was first published—"Business Adventures" remains the best business book I've ever read. John Brooks is still my favorite business writer. (And Warren, if you're reading this, I still have your copy.)